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Fraser of Inchcoulter

Adam Fraser of Inchcoulter died of fever at plantation Kingillie in Berbice in September 1805. Peter Fairbairn, who noted the death in a letter to Lord Seaforth (NAS GD46/17/27), described him as the 'youngest brother of Alex Fraser of Inchcoulter, who is on his way to Grenada'.

 

Alexander Fraser of Inchcoulter

In the late 1790s, Alexander Fraser (1759-1837) was in charge of the Baillie’s plantation Hermitage in Grenada, and was described, at this time, as a ‘planter of experience’. He was probably also a member of the Grenada Council. He had married Evan Baillie’s niece [Emilia Duff of Muirton] ‘some years ago’ and organised contributions from Grenada towards the founding of the Northern Infirmary in Inverness. Fraser’s son, born in Grenada in 1800/01, was named Evan Baillie Fraser (1800-91).

In 1806 Evan Baillie advanced £4500 on behalf of Fraser for the purchase of the Inchcoulter estate (also known as Balconie) in Ross-shire, where Fraser created the village of Evanton and where one of the streets was named Hermitage Street [Douglas Hamilton, p67 & 200; grave stones; Evanton Oral History Project].

By 1807 he was regularly described as ‘late of Grenada’ indicating that he was now resident in the UK. In 1812, with the death of Evan Baillie, Alexander Fraser entered into a partnership with Evan Baillie’s third son, James Evan Baillie, trading as JE Baillie, Fraser & Co of London. This company, dissolved in 1820, consisted of James Evan Baillie, Alexander Fraser, Hugh D Baillie, George H Ames and George Fowler. [London Gazette]

In 1825 Alexander Fraser owned plantation Livera in Grenada - after which another street in Evanton was named. [Slave Registers]. Fraser received compensation for his slaves in Grenada at emancipation.