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Grimsthorpe Castle September 2011

Kathleen Berg, bass viol, Spanish guitar and soprano voice: Alan Morris, bass viol.

We think of the revival of “early” music as being a modern phenomenon, but in fact there was great interest in old music in the eighteenth century. There was a society, “The Academy of Ancient Music” established some time in the 1740s by wealthy amateurs specifically to study the music (especially the sacred music) of olden times, and there were two substantial histories of music published in the 1770s by Charles Burney and John Hawkins. So we can well imagine that in the Vanbrugh Hall, some time around 1780, amateur musicians would have performed music from previous centuries. That is what we seek to re-create today.


The music:

Scribere proposui and There is no rose: two sacred songs from the 15th century.
Ave verum corpus: arranged for two viols from a motet by Josquin des Pres about 1500.
Recercarda on O felici occhi miei  an Italian song, by Diego Ortiz from his Trattado di Glosas Rome 1556.
Full fathom five and Come again, sweet love … two Elizabethan songs by Johnson & Dowland.
Recercarda on Doulce memoire, a French chanson, by Ortiz op. cit.
Quand je bois, a drinking song from Arbeau’s Orchesographie ca 1600.
Caleno custurame a Gaelic folksong harmonised by William Byrd ca 1600.

Fairest isle and Never weatherbeaten sail by Purcell (ca 1685) and Campion (ca 1600).

Ricercarda Segunda on an Italian song by Ortiz op. cit.
Suite for two bass viols in 4 movements: anonymous English, late 16th century.

A Dalmation cradle song taken from the singing of an Albanian peasant.
Now o now I needs must part Dowland.
Blame not my lute: with English words by Thomas Wyatt set to a Spanish song from the early years of the 16th century, together with a ricercarda on the same tune by Ortiz op. cit.
Ballo di Mantua and Duo IX for 2 bass viols by Giamberti ca 1600.
Dulce Jesus: a sacred song from Spanish America.

Greensleeves and a Galliard to the same basso by Ortiz op. cit.
His golden locks a song by Dowland.
Sonatina in F by Giovannino (ca. 1700)
Sleep wayward thoughts a song by Dowland.


The Instruments:

The bass viol had been the instrument of choice for gentleman (and some ladies) since its appearance in Spain around 1500 but by 1700 it was dropping out of use. A few professional virtuosi still played it at the end of the 18th century as did one or two amateurs: perhaps the most eminent of these was Thomas Gainsborough. The Spanish guitar was very popular throughout Europe, especially in France, but less so in England where our own English guitar (differently shaped and strung) was very popular, especially amongst ladies.

 


Lunchtime Concert at St Mary Magdalene Church, Bailgate, Lincoln
Saturday July 7th 2012

Programme

A Hymn on Divine Music by William Croft (d1727)

Süsse Stille, sanfte Quelle by George Frederick Handel (1685-1759)

Sonata Opus 5 No III in C major by Arcangelo Corelli 1653-1713)
adagio   allegro   adagio   allegro   allegro  

A new Ground in E minor by Henry Purcell (1659-1695)

Ah heav’n, what is’t I hear? by John Blow (1649-1708)
(from a celebration for St Cecilia, 1691)

Trio Sonata in C major by Robert Valentine (c1671-1747)
adagio   allegro   adagio   minuetto

Dear Adonis, Beauty’s Treasure by Handel

A Hymn for Easter Day by John Hill (fl. 1751-1791)


The composers whose works you will be hearing today are linked by their nationality – English. This needs explanation in two cases – Handel and Corelli. Handel was born in Germany but took English nationality in 1730, having lived in England since 1712. He worked as a young man in Rome at the noble courts of the Counts Ruspoli and Ottoboni, where the Italian Corelli was acknowledged master of the violin. Handel learned the Italian style of violin playing which so much influenced his compositional style from Corelli, one of whose sonatas we hear today.

Our first composer, William Croft, was a Warwickshire man who was educated at the Chapel Royal under John Blow. Henry Purcell also studied under him. By all accounts, Blow was a pleasant and well-respected man, resigning his position at the Chapel Royal in favour of his pupil Purcell. Blow also composed a lovely Ode in memory of Purcell on his death in 1695. In turn, when Blow died, Croft succeeded him as organist of Westminster Abbey. The author of the poem Croft sets here is unknown: perhaps it was Croft himself. In it the poet questions what music is – is it the spring? Is it love, or friendship? Or is it heaven – or is heaven music?

The German aria Süsse Stille composed by Handel in the 1720s has echoes of his Acis and Galatea:
The bubbling fountain, lo! it flows
Murm’ring still his gentle love

The text is by Barthold Heinrich Brockes, in a literary collection published in Hamburg, and was clearly intended to be set to music as a sacred cantata.

Sweet stillness, gentle fount of peaceful serenity, will delight my soul when I, after a time of laborious futility, look upon the peace which awaits us in eternity.


Our trio sonata is two parts upon a bass by Robert Valentine. He was a wind player and composer who wrote a great deal for the recorder. He moved to Italy to seek his fortune and in consequence changed his name to Valentino.

We close with two songs in English, one by Handel and another by the little-known John Hill. Handel wrote little in English except his oratorios: this aria “Dear Adonis” is from an otherwise lost cantata. Our last work is a piece from our unjustly neglected repertoire of Georgian Psalmody, the English Parish Church music of the 18th century, known today as “West Gallery Music”: an Easter Hymn with Hallelujahs from John Hill of Rugby. We have included this not only because it is a jolly finishing item, but as a reminder that the West Gallery movement, often mocked for its bucolic style, contains within it some fine composers and pieces which would grace any 18th century drawing room.

The Performers
Kathleen Berg (soprano, harpsichord)
Linda Hepburn Booth (soprano, harpsichord, recorder)
Chris Rogers (violin, harpsichord)
Alan Morris (violoncello)


Programme at Grimsthorpe Castle September 2012

Hymn to Divine Music by William Croft (1678 – 1727)
Sonata in C major: Vivace, Adagio, Minuetto
by Carl Friedrich Abel (1723 – 1787)
Three Scottish songs by Burns arranged by Joseph Haydn (1732 – 1809):
John Anderson; Had awa frae me Donal’; The gardener with his paidle
Two Pieces for violin by James Oswald (1711–1769):
O'er the moor to Katie; Scots measure
German aria by G. F. Handel (1685 – 1759):
Meine Seele hort im sehen
Three French pieces for violin: Marche pour les matelots (Marin Marais 1656 – 1728); Air; Rondeau (both J.B. de Boismortier 1691 - 1755)
Sonata for violoncello in D minor by Boismortier
Sonata for violin in F by Handel
Burns/Haydn song: Mount your baggage: duet for violin & ’cello by Oswald: The king shall enjoy his own again
Burns/Haydn song: The white cockade
An evening hymn: Henry  Purcell (1659 – 1695)
German aria by Handel:
Susse stille

Kathleen Berg: Soprano and harpsichord
Crauford Thomson: Violin
Alan Morris: Violoncello


Music at the Georgian Day at Ayscoughfee Hall, November 2012

Music by Purcell including Ah how pleasant ‘tis to love, Knotting song, airs and songs from the Restoration theatre, masquing tunes
Dance tunes including Lilliburlero, Sellengers round, Southern breezes, The Duke of Kent’s Waltz
Marches including Belle Isle march, The battle of the Nile
Songs by Lully, Daniel Purcell, Arne, Handel, Greene, Campion, 
Scottish songs and melodies including folk tunes, Bonny Kate of Edinburgh, music by James Oswald
Georgian psalmody tunes including Brailes, Mount Sinai, The barren fig tree
English folk songs including Love will find out the way, Tythe pig
Music known to have been written out and presumably played by Jane Austen, including The soldier’s adieu, My love she’s but a lassie yet
Well known songs from the period which remain popular to the present day, including Sweet lass of Richmond Hill, The lass with the delicate air, The rose of Tralee, When daisies pied, Where the bee sucks, Ye banks and braes, Nymphs and shepherds, Fairest Isle
Cello sonatas by Stephen Paxton and Boismortier
Harpsichord music by James Hook

 


Lunchtime Concert for Allegro Appassionato February 2013

Kathleen Berg (soprano and harpsichord)
Richard Lindsay (countertenor and recorder)
Alan Morris (bass viol)

Masque Dances:                                                        c1624

The Second of Grays Inn
The Nymphs dance
Some words from the Lords Masque
Song: Breathe again
The First of Sir John Paggintons

Extract from Te Deum Laudamus in D             Henry Purcell (1659-95)
Vouchsafe, O Lord

Bois épais                                                        J B Lully (1632-87)

Prelude in D minor                                           Purcell

Treizième Concert                                            François Couperin (1668-1733)
vivement - air  - sarabande - chaconne

Some words from Bonduca
Bonvica’s song                                                 Purcell

An Evening Hymn                                             Purcell

The music of the great English composer Henry Purcell forms the mainstay of today’s programme, and you will hear examples of both his sacred and secular writing. Interspersed with this we perform music by French masters, because we know that Purcell had a fondness for French forms and styles. One of his skills was writing for the theatre, so we open with masque music, from which Restoration theatre music developed.

Lenten Medtation at St Mary Magdalene Church, Bailgate, Lincoln,

March 2013

Pergolesi: Stabat Mater

Kathleen Berg (keyboard continuo) and Alan Morris (cello) together with Helen Vincent (soprano) Clare Lindsay (contralto) Sarah Lawson and Derek Wellman (violins) Andrew Lawson (viola) directed by Richard Lindsay

Pergolesi was maestro di capella of the Conservatorio dei poveri di Gesu Christo in Naples, and later held the same post to Ferdinando Colonna Stigliano, equerry to the Viceroy of Naples. He was a leading figure in the rise of Italian comic opera in the 18th century. Due to ill health later in life he moved to the Franciscan monastery in Pozzuoli.  His Stabat Mater, completed shortly before his death in 1736, was evidently intended to replace Alessandro Scarlatti’s, which had been performed annually in Naples during Lent. It achieved immediate popularity, and appeared in print many times during the 18th century.

 

Music “At Home”: from the Restoration to the Defeat of Napoleon. Programme given at the Admiral Rodney Hotel before the Regency Festival Ball, May 26th 2013, and the next day at Gunby Hall.

As is plain from the novels and memoirs of the time, our Georgian forebears entertained themselves at home with music. Today we recreate Georgian domestic music-making, with songs, dances and short instrumental pieces (no heavy sonatas!) drawn from printed and manuscript sources of the time. There was no solemnity to this music: it was played to be enjoyed, and if you are enjoying a glass of wine as you listen, so much the better!

We start with music of The Restoration. Much music written in the closing years of the seventeenth century remained popular throughout the eighteenth, repeatedly re-published in popular collections. No surprise when we remember that composers of the quality of Henry Purcell were active at that time.

Nymphs and shepherds (H. Purcell); Tell me no more (J. Blow); Oh the mighty power of love(J. Eccles); Man is for the woman made (H. Purcell).

Next, some of Squire Western’s favourites: Country Songs and Dances. “It was Mr Western's custom every afternoon, as soon as he was drunk, to hear his daughter play on the harpsichord; for he was a great lover of music … He never relished any music but what was light and airy; and indeed his most favourite tunes were Old Sir Simon the King …” (from H. Fieldings’s novel Tom Jones)

Old Sir Simon the King (traditional); Sellinger’s Round (country dance tune); Come let’s be merry (minuet); Tythe pig (also known as the song Harvest Home, thought to have been either by Purcell or used by him in King Arthur).

The Celtic Fringes of the British Isles have their distinctive styles of music which was domesticated for home use (no bagpipes!).

The cock laird (J.Oswald); The shepherd’s pipe (J Oswald); The Rose of Tralee (trad. Irish); The Welsh harper (Pyle ms); The white cockade (trad. Scottish).

There was much public music, especially in Theatres and pleasure gardens such as Vauxhall. This music was conceived on a large scale with orchestra but much of it was adapted and published for home performance.

The cure of care (R. Leveridge); The lass with the delicate air (M. Arne) Over the hills (traditional English, as performed in The Beggar’s Opera); The Lass of Richmond Hill (J. Hook).

Another form of public music making was in Church: what we now call Georgian Psalmody is the music that church-goers would have heard – and the devout amongst them would have performed at home.

Brailes (W.G. Perry); Mount Sinai (R. Hudson); Avon (C.W. Bannister); Never weatherbeaten sail (T. Campion); The barren fig tree (J. Beaumont);

The French Wars: for roughly half of our period, England was at war with France. No excuse is needed for patriotic music.

The Battle of the Nile (One of several marches and ballads circulating at the time); Belle Isle march (performed by the 3 regiments of footguards before His Majesty in Hyde park in 1763).

Finally, Jane Austen’s music: Six music books which belonged to Jane survive, two of them written in her own hand. She was an avid pianist: her love of music, and its importance to her society, shines through her writing.

Duke of Kent’s Waltz (found in an unnamed collection of music at the British Museum in 1802); Dear is my little native veil (J. Hook); Sweet transports (W. Shield); Soldier’s adieu (C. Dibdin).

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Lincoln Drill hall, Friday June 7th 2013

Musick Rediscover’d

Music “At Home”: from the Glorious Revolution to the Defeat of Napoleon.

As is plain from the novels and memoirs of the time, our Georgian forebears entertained themselves at home with music. Today we recreate Georgian domestic music-making, with songs, dances and short instrumental pieces (no heavy sonatas!) drawn from printed and manuscript sources of the time. There was no solemnity to this music: it was played to be enjoyed, and if you are enjoying a glass of wine as you listen, so much the better!

We start with music of The Glorious Revolution – the deposition of James II and accession of William & Mary. Much music written in the closing years of the seventeenth century remained popular throughout the eighteenth, repeatedly re-published in collections. No surprise when we remember that composers of the quality of Henry Purcell were active at that time!

Man is for the woman made (H. Purcell); 2nd Ladies’ Masque (H. Purcell) and Cupid make your virgins tender (D. Purcell); Nymphs and shepherds (H. Purcell); Tell me no more (J. Blow); Oh the mighty power of love (J. Eccles).

Next, some of Squire Western’s favourites: Country Songs and Dances. “It was Mr Western's custom every afternoon, as soon as he was drunk, to hear his daughter play on the harpsichord; for he was a great lover of music … He never relished any music but what was light and airy; and indeed his most favourite tunes were Old Sir Simon the King …” (from H. Fielding’s novel Tom Jones).

Old Sir Simon the King (traditional); Sellinger’s Round (country dance tune); Come let’s be merry (minuet); Corn Riggs (a country dance) and Sir Roger de Coverley (a very popular and lively dance); Tythe pig (also known as the song Harvest Home, thought to have been written by Purcell, used by him in King Arthur).

The Celtic Fringes of the British Isles have their distinctive styles of music which was domesticated for home use (no bagpipes!).

The cock laird (J.Oswald); The shepherd’s pipe (J Oswald); The Rose of Tralee (trad. Irish); The Welsh harper (Pyle ms); The white cockade (trad. Scottish).

There was much public music, especially in Theatres and Pleasure Gardens such as Vauxhall. This music was conceived on a large scale with orchestra but much of 
it was adapted and published for home performance.

Where the bee sucks (T. Arne); The cure of care (R. Leveridge); The lass with the delicate air (M. Arne); Over the hills (traditional English, as performed in The Beggar’s Opera); The Lass of Richmond Hill (J. Hook).

Another form of public music making was in Church: what we now call Georgian Psalmody is the music that church-goers would have heard – and the devout amongst them would have performed at home.

Brailes (W.G. Perry); Mount Sinai (R. Hudson); Avon (C.W. Bannister); Never weatherbeaten sail (T. Campion); The barren fig tree (J. Beaumont).

The Continental Connection: Songs from Italy and France were very popular especially with accomplished young ladies who could show off their linguistic skills as well as musical. Perhaps not surprisingly French songs were less fashionable than Italian: especially songs drawn from the ever-fashionable Italian opera.

Bois epais (J.B. Lully); Sans y penser and Quant on suit (G.F. Handel); Fleuve du Tage (a well-known tune at the time but attributed to more than one composer); Star vicino (S. Rosa); Dove sei (Handel).

The French Wars: for roughly half of our period, England was at war with France. No excuse is needed for patriotic music.

The Buckinghamshire March & Belle Isle march (performed by the 3 regiments of footguards before His Majesty in Hyde park in 1763); The Battle of the Nile (celebrating Nelson’s famous victory).

Finally, Jane Austen’s music: Six music books which belonged to Jane survive, two of them written in her own hand. She was an avid pianist: her love of music, and its importance to her society, shines through her novels.

Sweet transports (W. Shield); Duke of Kent’s Waltz (found in an unnamed collection of music at the British Museum in 1802); Robin Adair (trad. Irish); Soldier’s adieu (C. Dibdin); Dear is my little native vale (J. Hook).

Music Rediscover’d

Kathleen Berg (soprano, harpsichord, common flute) Alan Morris (’cello)

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Music “At Home”: from the Glorious Revolution to the Defeat of Napoleon. The Vanbrugh Hall at Grimsthorpe Castle, July 21st 2013

As is plain from the novels and memoirs of the time, our Georgian forebears entertained themselves at home with music. Today we recreate Georgian domestic music-making, with songs, dances and short instrumental pieces drawn from printed and manuscript sources of the time. There was no solemnity to this music: it was played to be enjoyed and we hope you enjoy it too, as you stroll around this lovely Georgian mansion.

We start with music of The Glorious Revolution – the deposition of James II and accession of William & Mary. Much music written in the closing years of the seventeenth century remained popular throughout the eighteenth, repeatedly re-published in collections. No surprise when we remember that composers of the quality of Henry Purcell were active at that time!

Man is for the woman made (H. Purcell); 2nd Ladies’ Masque (H. Purcell) and Cupid make your virgins tender (D. Purcell); Nymphs and shepherds (H. Purcell); Tell me no more (J. Blow); Oh the mighty power of love (J. Eccles). Lilliburlero and Black Jack (2 dances).

Next, some of Squire Western’s favourites: Country Songs and Dances. “It was Mr Western's custom every afternoon, as soon as he was drunk, to hear his daughter play on the harpsichord; for he was a great lover of music … He never relished any music but what was light and airy; and indeed his most favourite tunes were Old Sir Simon the King …” (from H. Fielding’s novel Tom Jones).

Old Sir Simon the King (traditional); Sellinger’s Round (country dance tune); Come let’s be merry (minuet); Corn Riggs (a country dance) and Sir Roger de Coverley (a very popular and lively dance); Tythe pig (also known as the song Harvest Home, thought to have been written by Purcell, used by him in King Arthur).

The Celtic Fringes of the British Isles have their distinctive styles of music which was domesticated for home use (no bagpipes!).

The cock laird (J.Oswald); The shepherd’s pipe (J Oswald); The Rose of Tralee (trad. Irish); The Welsh harper (Pyle ms); The white cockade (trad. Scottish).


There was much public music, especially in Theatres and Pleasure Gardens such as Vauxhall. This music was conceived on a large scale with orchestra but much of 
it was published in adaptations for home performance.

Battle of the Nile (March); Where the bee sucks (T. Arne); The cure of care (R. Leveridge); The lass with the delicate air (M. Arne); Belle Isle March; Over the hills (traditional English, as performed in The Beggar’s Opera); Sonata for cello in D major (S. Paxton); As Cupid roguishly one day (J. Eccles); Now Phoebus sinketh in the west (from Milton’s Masque of Comus, set by T. Arne); Homeward Bound (M. Arne); The Lass of Richmond Hill (J. Hook).

Another form of public music making was in Church: what we now call Georgian Psalmody is the music that church-goers would have heard – and the devout amongst them would have performed at home.

Brailes (W.G. Perry); Mount Sinai (R. Hudson); Avon (C.W. Bannister); Never weatherbeaten sail (T. Campion); The barren fig tree (J. Beaumont); Funeral Hymn to the Winterboune tune (W.Knapp); Hymn of Eve (T. Arne).

The Continental Connection: Songs from Italy and France were very popular especially with accomplished young ladies who could show off their linguistic as well as musical skills. Perhaps not surprisingly French songs were less fashionable than Italian: especially popular were songs drawn from the ever-fashionable Italian opera.

Bois epais (J.B. Lully); Sans y penser and Quant on suit (G.F. Handel); Fleuve du Tage (a well-known tune at the time but attributed to more than one composer); Star vicino (S. Rosa); Dove sei (Handel).

Finally, Jane Austen’s music: Six music books which belonged to Jane survive, two of them written in her own hand. She was an avid pianist: her love of music, and its importance to her society, shines through her novels. These pieces are all taken from her own books.

Duke of Kent’s Waltz (anon); Sweet transports (W. Shield); Robin Adair (trad. Irish); Soldier’s adieu (C. Dibdin); Dear is my little native vale (J. Hook).

Kathleen Berg (soprano, harpsichord, common flute) Alan Morris (’cello)

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Music “At Home” during the long eighteenth century - Grimsthorpe Castle August 25th 2013

The period of English history from the deposition of James II by William of Orange in the Glorious Revolution of 1688 to the final defeat of Napoleon in 1815 is often described as the “long” eighteenth century. This was a period of relative homogeneity in the arts, although in music there were substantial changes afoot at the end of the eighteenth century with the gradual abandonment of the styles and techniques of baroque music in favour of the more modern styles we now call classical.

As is plain from the novels and memoirs of the time, our eighteenth century forebears entertained themselves at home with music. Today we are recreating domestic music-making of the period, with songs, dances, instrumental pieces, all drawn from printed and manuscript sources of the time. There was no solemnity to this music: it was played to be enjoyed and we hope you enjoy it too, as you stroll around this lovely mansion.

We start with music of the time of The Glorious Revolution. Much music written in the closing years of the seventeenth century remained popular throughout the eighteenth, repeatedly re-published in collections. No surprise when we remember that composers of the quality of Henry Purcell were active at that time!

Aire (W. Croft) & Hornpipe (D. Purcell); O let me weep (H. Purcell); Lilliburlero & Black Jack (Two dances).

Next, some of Squire Western’s favourites: Country Songs and Dances. “It was Mr Western's custom every afternoon, as soon as he was drunk, to hear his daughter play on the harpsichord; for he was a great lover of music … He never relished any music but what was light and airy; and indeed his most favourite tunes were Old Sir Simon the King …” (from H. Fielding’s novel Tom Jones).

Old Sir Simon the King (trad.); Sellenger’s Round (country dance tune); Come let’s be merry (minuet); Three English Folk Fiddle Dances; Tythe pig (also known as the song Harvest Home, thought to have been written by Purcell, used by him in King Arthur).

The Celtic Fringes of the British Isles have their distinctive styles of music which was domesticated for polite use (no bagpipes!).

The Shepherd’s Pipe (J. Oswald); MacPherson’s lament on being hanged in Banff in 1723; The Bush aboon Traquair from Sonata in D major (S. Paxton); Robin Adair (trad. Irish).

There was much public music, especially in Theatres and Pleasure Gardens such as Vauxhall. This music was conceived on a large scale with orchestra but much of it was published in adaptations for home performance.

Battle of the Nile (March); Come away death (T. Arne); Prelude from Suite in F major (H. Purcell) & The Wedding Day (J. Hook); Come calm content (T. Arne); The complaint (T. Arne).

The Continental Connection: Songs from Italy and France were very popular especially with accomplished young ladies who could show off their linguistic as well as musical skills. Perhaps not surprisingly French songs were less modish than Italian: especially popular were songs drawn from the ever-fashionable Italian opera. And many of the composers working in London were from continental Europe, especially from Germany and Italy.

Aux plaisirs (P. Guedron); Aire & Rondeau (J. Boismortier); Star vicino (S. Rosa); Adagio & Allegro (G. Handel); Fleuve du Tage (a well-known tune from the early nineteenth century, attributed to more than one composer); Hornpipe a l’Inglese (J. Galliard).

Finally, Jane Austen’s music: Six music books which belonged to Jane survive, two of them written in her own hand. She was an avid pianist: her love of music, and its importance to her society, shines through her novels. These pieces are taken from her own books.

Duke of Kent’s Waltz (anon); Dear is my little native vale (J. Hook).

Musick Rediscover’d

Kathleen Berg (soprano, harpsichord, common flute) Alan Morris (’cello)
Crauford Thomson (violin)

Learn more about us at www.spanglefish.com/musickrediscoverd/

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Stamford Town Hall, as part of Stamford Georgian Festival, 2013

See recent programmes (above) for details of the following pieces:

The Battle of the Nile, Man is for the woman made, Sellengers round, Nymphs and shepherds, Come away death, The barren fig tree, Now Phoebus sinketh in the west, Love will find out the way, Over the hills, Sour plums and Scots measure, Ye banks and braes, Brailes, Sweet transports, The soldier’s adieu, Two movements from cello sonata by S. Paxton: The Bush aboon Traquair, Vivace, Mr Prince’s song, Mrs Prince’s song, O the mighty power of love, Bois epais, Sans y penser, Quant en suit, Three movements from cello sonata in C, By M. Corrette: Adagio, Allegro, Minuet, Homeward bound, As Cupid roguishly, The Duke of Kent’s waltz, The lass of Richmond Hill, Come let’s be merry, Robin Adair, Lilliburlero and Black Jack, Hymn of Eve, Dove sei, The lass with the delicate air, The shepherd’s pipe, The 2nd ladies’ masque, Cupid make your virgins tender, The Cock Laird, Tell me no more, The jolly jolly breeze, Where the bee sucks, The standing masque, The 2nd of John Paggintons, The 3rd of John Pagginttons, The 1st of John Paggintons, Avon, Two Minuets from cello sonata in D by W. de Fesch, Mount Sinai, Never weatherbeaten sail, Lament for the turning of the year, The white cockade, The Welsh harper, Go, rose, Fleuve du Tage, Star vicino, Two movements from cello sonata by  J. E. Galliard Hornpipe a l’Inglese, Vivace, Aux plaisirs, Wedding day, The rose of Tralee, I saw that you were grown so high, The knotting song, When daisies pied, The mansion of peace, Tythe pig, The cure of care, Dear is my little native vale

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Waddington Masqued Ball December 2013

Music included: cello sonatas by Gabrielli and Vivaldi, music by Marini, Rossi, Buonamenti, trio sonatas by Sammartini, Corelli and Bononcini, arias by Handel, Strozzi, violin sonatas.

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A Georgian Christmas at Gunby Hall December 2013


Today we are portraying a lady and gentleman informally “at home” singing and playing for their own pleasure (and their visiting friends) in Gunby Hall in about 1770.

We are performing a programme of (mostly) English Chrismas music, dating from the 15th to the 18th century. The music is a mixture of the very well known and the less well known, but all could have been heard at Gunby in the latter years of the 18th century.

The instruments we are using (harpsichord, Spanish guitar, recorder – then known as the common flute – bass viol and ‘cello) would have all been familiar to the people of Gunby: and our costumes (robe volante for Kathleen and banyan for Alan) were typical of the time.

We hope you enjoy our music. We are always glad to talk about the music and instruments of olden days – music we are constantly rediscovering.

Personent hodie
Edi beo thu
My little sweet darling
All my heart this night rejoices
There is no rose
Patapan
Good King Wenceslas
Kingsbridge
Tomorrow shall be my dancing day
Cranbrook
Joy to the world
While shepherds watched (metrical)
Nativity
Sweet Christmas bells

2
Pastoral symphony
Messiah sequence
Born is the babe
The first part of the old year
The last part of the old year
King Herod and the cock
Remember O thou man
Past three o’clock
The angel Gabriel
Gloucestershire Wassail
While shepherds watched (Philips)
I heard the bells on Christmas day
Come let us all with heart and voice
Sans day carol
Come celebrate th’auspicious morn
The holly and the ivy

3
M. Charpentier’s Christmas Stomp
Coventry carol
El decembre congelat
Lute book lullaby
Ding dong ding
Myn liking
To drive the cold winter away
God rest you merry
A Christmas carol (Ashworth)
Lydia
O Christmas now
Song of the angels
Christmas chimes

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The Punch Bowl, Warwick, December 2013

Patapan, King Herod and the Cock, While shepherds watched (tune by Philips), Sans Day carol, O Christmas now is drawing near at hand

April 2014, St Mary Magdalen Church, Lincoln

Pergolesi's Stabat Mater (together with Rachael Brook, Clare Lindsay, Chris Rogers, Rosalind Millward, Andrew Lawson and Esther Ward-Caddle) directed by Richard Lindsay

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Music in the Dining Room at Gunby Hall, May 2014 as part of the Regency Day.

Love songs

Come hither you that love, Silent worship, Sweet transports, So sweet are the charms of love, Have you seen but a white lily grow

Pastoral songs

Where the bee sucks, Long has Pastora ruled the plain The jolly jolly breeze, Now Phoebus sinketh in the west

 Dance tunes: Old Rosin the Beau, My wife's a wanton wee thing, My delight
 
All men must die....

Come heavy sleep, Full fathom five, Sonata in Em 1st movement Marcello, Come away death, As I walked forth

 Some of them at sea....

Ned that died at sea, The bonny sailor, Tom Bowling, Homeward bound

Cello sonata Paxton

 Patriotic songs

The white cockade, Twelve hundred years, God save great George our King, Fairest Isle

 More love songs

Oh the mighty power of love, In faith ‘tis true, Doux liens de mon coeur, Bid me but live, Enfin la beaute, As Cupid roguishly one day, Who knocks at my heart  

Love causing trouble

What then is love but mourning, Perfidissimo volto, Tell me no more, Non e pena maggior, The scolding wife, Miserere, When daisies pied, Jessie, The forsaken nymph, Star vicino

Viol solo  2 Tenores by Ortiz

 Songs with spiritual texts

Sing a song of joy, Wilt thou forgive that sin (Hilton), Wilt thou forgive that sin (Humfrey) Brailes

 Drinking songs

Thou flask once filled, Amis ne quittons point la table,  

More countryside pleasures and a trip to London

Dear is my little native vale, Aux plaisirs, The fly, Two bunches a penny 

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Lincoln Friends’ Meeting House Programme

 We call ourselves Musick Rediscover’d, and we present music from medieval times to the late 18th century. There is evidence that some people from the 18th century were interested in reviving the music of earlier times, and we aim to recreate this “looking backwards” as well as playing the music which fits with the clothes we are wearing today.

We have also looked into music which has a connection with the Quakers. We could not find out much about the attitude towards music of the founder, George Fox, who died in 1691. But he has been  quoted as saying that secular music stirred up people to vanity. In general it was to take until the 19th century for most Quakers to accept and use music.

 Solomon Eccles (1618 – 1683) came from a musical family but was an early convert to Quakerism, and he renounced his former involvement with music. Despite their father’s displeasure Eccles’ two sons, John and Henry, became musicians who wrote a great deal of secular music.

 The jolly jolly breeze (John Eccles)

 We continue with two settings of John Donne’s well-known poem A Hymn to God the Father. The contrasting musical styles of John Hilton (from the Jacobean period) and Humfrey (Restoration) can be clearly heard – Hilton’s is contemplative and Humfrey’s dramatic.

 Wilt thou forgive that sin (John Hilton)

Wilt thou forgive that sin (Pelham Humfrey)

 There was much displeasure in 17th and  early18th century within the church about setting the psalms to metrical tunes, which used specially written re-workings of Biblical texts, in particular those of Sternhold and Hopkins.

 The humble sute of a sinner (Example from Este’s Psalter)

 There was also discontent about the way the parish churches used music to stir up people’s emotions, including of course the music known today as Georgian Psalmody (or West Gallery Music)

 Come thou fount of every blessing (Brailes)

 Secular music may have been discouraged at first, but some tunes survived which were associated with the Quakers, such as So merrily danced the Quaker, first appearing in 1786 as a song, but can be traced back earlier than this as a military march for fifes and drums.

 Merrily danced the Quaker

 Charles Dibdin was a well-known composer in the 18th century whose songs were very popular at the Vauxhall Gardens entertainments. He wrote a comic opera called The Quaker, which was performed in 1775 at the Drury Lane Theatre and again in Philadelphia in 1794. The libretto tells the story of a young girl, Gillian, whose parents are persuaded by a rich Quaker to let here become his wife. She finds him staid and not to her liking. The other problem is that she is in love with Lubin, a man of her own age. But eventually the Quaker gives his blessing on them both and withdraws his suit and all is well.

 Extract from the dialogue:

Mr. Steady (the Quaker). And why, young maiden, wilt thou not listen unto me? Have I not, for thy pleasure, given into all the vanities in which youth delights? I tell thee, that altho’ my complexion be saturnine, my manners are not austere; why therefore likest thou not me?

Gillian: I should like you very well if you were my father, but I don’t like you at all for a husband.

S. And wherefore, I pray you?

G. Oh, there are reasons enough.

S. Which be they?

G. Why, in the first place, I should want you to change your cloaths, and to have you as spruce as I am.

S Rather do thou change those thou wearest, unto the likeness of mine. The dove regardeth not the gay plumage of the gaudy mackaw, and the painted rainbow delighteth our sight, but it vanishes away, yea, even as a vapour. What more?

G. Why, in the next place, I would want to change your age, and have you as young as I am.

 Overture from The Quaker

I said to myself (Aria from The Quaker)

Gavotto Rondo (instrumental interlude from The Quaker)

 George Fox travelled in America and there is a good Quaker tradition there. Haverford College have a strong presence on the internet and tell the story of David Bispham, known as the Quaker singer. He was born in Philadelphia in 1857. Because the playing of instruments was not allowed he did not get to play the zither, guitar and banjo, all of which he loved playing, in 1872 at his first concert. However as things became more relaxed he developed his musical programme in grand style. He went on to include medieval music by the Troubadours and Minnesingers in his concert in 1900.

 Winder wie ist nu dein kraft (medieval German)

C’est la fin (medieval French)

 And also he included arias from French, German and Italian operas and oratorios.

 Dove sei (Handel, from Rodelinda)
Bois epais (Lully, from Amadis)

 There was opera in England too and a wealth of dramatic solo songs.

 Who knocks at my heart (Daniel Purcell)

 We end with three pieces from the Quaker Songbook.

 Love is come again
God moves in a mysterious way
Vine and fig tree

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Musick Rediscover’d at Grimsthorpe Castle May 2014

 Love songs

Come hither you that love

Have you seen but a white lily grow

New Noddy

Old Noddy

 

Pastoral songs

Where the bee sucks

Now Phoebus sinketh in the west

So sweet are the charms of love

 Solo - Violin sonata in Am - Marcello

 Instrumental music

Recorder tunes: Old Rosin the Beau, The water of Tyne, My delight

Violin - Hector the Hero

 
All men must die....

Come heavy sleep

Full fathom five

Cello Sonata in Em - Marcello

Come away death

 Some of them at sea....

Ned that died at sea

Tom Bowling

 Solo

Violin sonata in Dm - Paisible

 More love songs

Doux liens de mon coeur

Enfin la beaute

2 French tunes (violin)

Who knocks at my heart

 Solo

Cello sonata in D - Paxton

 

Love causing trouble

Non e pena maggior

The scolding wife

Miserere

 Solos

Violin - Macpherson’s lament

Viol – Ricercada I - Ortiz

 Songs with spiritual texts

Sing a song of joy

Wilt thou forgive that sin (Hilton)

Wilt thou forgive that sin (Humfrey)

Come thou fount - Brailes

Instrumental interlude

Violin and cello - Boismortier Sonata in Em

 
Yet more love songs

Cherries and plums

Man is for the woman made

 Solo

Violin sonata in F - Handel

 Scottish Folk songs set by Haydn

 Had awa frae me

 The gardner with his paidle

 Love will find out the way

 I love my love in secret

 John Anderson my Jo

 

Dance tunes

Recorder tunes: The ploughboy, My wife’s a wanton wee thing, The 29th of May

Violin solo tunes

Merrily danced the Quaker

Musick Rediscover’d: Kathleen Berg (soprano, harpsichord and recorder) Crauford Thomson (violin) Alan Morris (violoncello and viola da gamba).

 Our aim is to re-create the performance of music as it might have been in a gentleman’s home around 1780. To this end we play music which would have been available at that time: this includes older music, from Tudor times onward, and music from abroad, especially from Italy and France. We use instruments such as they were at that time, and we have adopted the costume of the period – especially appropriate for the Vanbrugh Hall.

 Read about us at http://www.spanglefish.com/musickrediscoverd/

 

Musick Rediscover’d at Grimsthorpe Castle July 2014

Love songs

Come hither you that love

Have you seen but a white lily grow

New Noddy

Old Noddy

 Pastoral songs

Where the bee sucks

Now Phoebus sinketh in the west

So sweet are the charms of love

 Instrumental music

Recorder tunes: Old Rosin the Beau, The water of Tyne, My delight

 All men must die....

Come heavy sleep

Full fathom five

Cello Sonata in Em - Marcello

Come away death

 Some of them at sea....

Ned that died at sea

Tom Bowling

 More love songs

Doux liens de mon coeur

Enfin la beaute

Who knocks at my heart

 Love causing trouble

Non e pena maggior

The scolding wife

Miserere

 Songs with spiritual texts

Sing a song of joy

Wilt thou forgive that sin (Hilton)

Wilt thou forgive that sin (Humfrey)

Come thou fount - Brailes

 Yet more love songs

Cherries and plums

Man is for the woman made

 Dance tunes

Recorder tunes: The ploughboy, My wife’s a wanton wee thing, The 29th of May

Merrily danced the Quaker

Musick Rediscover’d - Kathleen Berg (soprano, harpsichord and recorder) Alan Morris (violoncello and viola da gamba).

 We will be playing through this programme this afternoon. If time permits, we will play other repertoire, which may include music by Handel, Eccles, Dibdin, Ortiz, Purcell, Arne, Blow, Greene, Grandi, Lully and Breval. 

Our aim is to re-create the performance of music as it might have been in a gentleman’s home around 1780. To this end we play music which would have been available at that time: this includes older music, from Tudor times onward, and music from abroad, especially from Italy and France. We use instruments such as they were at that time, and we have adopted the costume of the period – especially appropriate for the Vanbrugh Hall.

Musick Rediscover’d at Ayscoughfee Hall, August 2014

 Music for Shakespeare and his time

Where the bee sucks

Come heavy sleep

Come hither you that love

New Noddy

Old Noddy

Full fathom five

Have you seen but a white lily grow

Sing a song of joy

The scolding wife

Miserere

 

Love songs

So sweet are the charms of love

Recorder tunes: My wife’s a wanton wee thing, The water of Tyne

Silent worship

Now Phoebus sinketh in the west

Sonata in D - Paxton

Man is for the woman made

As Cupid roguishly one day

Who knocks at my heart

 
Music from across the water – France, Italy, Spain, Germany

Recercada I sopra La Spagna

RecercadaVII sopra La Romanesca

Non e pena maggior

Doux liens de mon coeur

Sonata – Merci

Enfin la beaute

Star vicino

Madrid Night watch etc - Boccherini

 

To commemorate Charles Dibdin
 (c1745-1814)

Overture to “The Quaker”

I said to myself

Gavotto rondo

Cherries and plums

Ned that died at sea

The soldier’s adieu

Tom Bowling

 In the midst of life......

Cello Sonata in Em - Marcello

Come away death

Wilt thou forgive that sin (Hilton)

Wilt thou forgive that sin (Humfrey)

Come thou fount – Brailes

 

Dance tunes

Recorder tunes: The ploughboy, The 29th of May

Merrily danced the Quaker/Merrily kiss the Quaker

Old Rosin the Beau, My delight

Musick Rediscover’d

 Kathleen Berg (soprano, harpsichord and common flute)

Alan Morris (violoncello and viola da gamba)

 Our aim is to re-create the performance of music as it might have been in a gentleman’s home around 1780. To this end we play music which would have been available at that time: this includes older music, from Tudor times onward, and music from abroad, especially from Italy and France. We use instruments such as they were at that time, and we have adopted the costume of the period.

Musick Rediscover’d

 Hertford Friends' Meeting House 28th September 2014

We call ourselves Musick Rediscover’d, and we present music from medieval times to the late 18th century. There is evidence that some people from the 18th century were interested in reviving the music of earlier times, and we aim to recreate this “looking backwards” as well as playing the music which fits with the clothes we are wearing today.

 As Cupid roguishly one day (Eccles) 

Wilt thou forgive that sin (John Hilton)

Wilt thou forgive that sin (Pelham Humfrey)

 The humble sute of a sinner from Este’s Psalter

 Come thou fount of every blessing (tune: Brailes)

 Merrily danced the Quaker/Merrily kiss the Quaker

Overture to The Quaker (Charles Dibdin)

I said to myself (Aria from The Quaker)

Gavotto Rondo (Dance from The Quaker)

Incidentally, this year (2014) is the bicentenary of Dibdin’s death.

 Winder wie ist nu dein kraft (medieval German)
C’est la fin (medieval French)

Somewhat musing (Fayrfax)

 Dove sei (Handel, from Rodelinda)
Bois epais (Lully, from Amadis)

 Who knocks at my heart? (Daniel Purcell)

 Three pieces from the Quaker Song Book:
Love is come again
God moves in a mysterious way
Vine and fig tree

 

Louth, Allegro Appassionato 1 Ottobre  2014:

Music of the theatre and chamber for voices and instruments from the eighteenth century.

 German pastoral: three movements from a suite by Telemann for recorder and basso continuo in G: siciliano; aria 1o; aria 2mo.

 London Theatre: Charles Dibdin (1745 – 1814): Songs “Cherries and Plums”, and “Tom Bowling”; Overture, song “I said to myself” and Gavotte en rondeau from the Opera “The Quaker”.

 French galanterie: Aria by JB Lully “Bois epais” and Sonate en trio by JB Boismortier for recorder and viola da gamba: allegro; adagio; allegro.

Italian Rococo: Tre arie: “Tanto sospirero”  (PP Bencini 1700 – 1755); “Nina” (GB Pergolesi (1710 – 1736) and “O cessate di piagarmi” (A Scarlatti 1659 – 1725).

 Vauxhall Gardens: Song “When daisies pied” by TA Arne (1710 – 1778).

 Musick Rediscover’d

 Kathleen Berg (soprano, recorder, harpsichord)

Richard Lindsay (counter-tenor, recorder, harpsichord)

Alan Morris (viola da gamba, violoncello)

 http://www.spanglefish.com/musickrediscoverd/

 

 Music for Bedford Gallery Quire Entertainment November 2014

Procession of the Night Watch in Madrid (Boccherini)

The Bonny Sailor (James Hook)

French 18th song (anon)

Doulce Memoire (Sandrin)

Variations on Doulce Memoire (Ortiz)

King Herod and the Cock (trad)

Fum fum fum (trad Catalan)

Stille Nacht (Gruber)

While shepherds watched (Philips)

 

Christmas music at Gunby Hall 30th November 2014

Christmas 2014

 Personent hodie

Edi beo thu

Coventry carol

El desembre

 My little sweet darling

While shepherds (metrical)

Lute book Lullaby

All my heart this night rejoices

 Patapan
Sans day carol
Away in a manger
Tomorrow shall be my dancing day
Angels’ lullaby
Joy to the world

 Ding dong ding

Born is the babe

The holy son of God

Fum fum fum

 Sweet Christmas bells

The angel Gabriel

Past 3 o’clock

I saw three ships

John of Paris

 To drive the cold winter away

Good King Wenceslas

The holly and the ivy

Cranbrook

 Es ist ein ros

Suite of French Noels

King Herod and the cock

Remember O thou man

Myn liking

Stille nacht

 Come let us all

God rest you merry

O Christmas now

Gloucestershire wassail

 Let an anthem of praise

Nativity

Christmas chimes

Come celebrate

The song of the angels

I heard the bells

While shepherds (Philips)

Musick Rediscover’d – a programme of music from the eighteenth century

 

Gunby Hall 4th May 2015

 

All the music is sung to accompaniment of ‘cello and harpsichord except where otherwise stated.

 

Music from England:

 

Tell me no more Blow: Tell me no more Boyce: Now Phoebus sinketh in the west Arne: When daisies pied Arne: Cantabile for ‘cello Gaillard: Cruel Amynta de Fesch: The lass with the delicate air Arne: Jessie anon: Mansion of peace Webbe:

 

Music from Scotland:

 

A man’s a man for a’that trad (Burns):: Scots wha’hae trad (Burns): Robin Adair trad: Ye banks and braes trad: An you were my ane thing trad: The Cock Laird for ‘cello Oswald: The white cockade trad, after Haydn (Burns):  My love is like a red, red rose trad (Burns). Folk song medley for flute and ‘cello.

 

Music from Ireland:

 

The harp that once did Tara’s halls trad: The rose of Tralee trad: St Patrick’s breastplate trad: Folk song medley for flute and ‘cello: The minstrel boy trad. The bush aboon Traqair for ‘cello Paxton:

 

Music from Italy:

 

Star vicino Rosa: Grave and Presto for ‘cello Caldara: Dove sei Handel: Amor Amor Strozzi: Military night watch procession for ‘cello Boccherini: O cessate Scarlatti.

 

And more music from England:

 

When a tender maid Linley: Cherries and plums Dibdin: Merrily danced the Quaker anon: Merrily kissed the Quaker for flute and ‘cello trad: The lass of Richmond Hill Hook: Largo, Hornpipe and Vivace for cello Gaillard: Man is for the woman made Purcell: Two minuets for ‘cello de Fesch: Dear is my little native vale Hook.

Kathleen Berg: soprano, harpsichord and common flute: arranger.

Alan Morris: baroque ‘cello.

 

Musick Rediscover’d – a programme of music from the eighteenth century at Gunby Hall 4th May 2015

 All the music is sung to accompaniment of ‘cello and harpsichord except where otherwise stated.

 

Music from England:

 

Tell me no more Blow: Tell me no more Boyce: Now Phoebus sinketh in the west Arne: When daisies pied Arne: Cantabile for ‘cello Gaillard: Cruel Amynta de Fesch: The lass with the delicate air Arne: Jessie anon: Mansion of peace Webbe:

 

Music from Scotland:

 

A man’s a man for a’that trad (Burns):: Scots wha’hae trad (Burns): Robin Adair trad: Ye banks and braes trad: An you were my ane thing trad: The Cock Laird for ‘cello Oswald: The white cockade trad, after Haydn (Burns):  My love is like a red, red rose trad (Burns). Folk song medley for flute and ‘cello.

 

Music from Ireland:

 

The harp that once did Tara’s halls trad: The rose of Tralee trad: St Patrick’s breastplate trad: Folk song medley for flute and ‘cello: The minstrel boy trad. The bush aboon Traqair for ‘cello Paxton:

 

Music from Italy:

 

Star vicino Rosa: Grave and Presto for ‘cello Caldara: Dove sei Handel: Amor Amor Strozzi: Military night watch procession for ‘cello Boccherini: O cessate Scarlatti.

 

And more music from England:

 

When a tender maid Linley: Cherries and plums Dibdin: Merrily danced the Quaker anon: Merrily kissed the Quaker for flute and ‘cello trad: The lass of Richmond Hill Hook: Largo, Hornpipe and Vivace for cello Gaillard: Man is for the woman made Purcell: Two minuets for ‘cello de Fesch: Dear is my little native vale Hook.

 

Musick rediscover’d

 

Kathleen Berg: soprano, harpsichord and common flute: arranger.

Alan Morris: baroque ‘cello.

 

Musick Rediscover’d at Grimsthorpe Castle July 2015

 

English airs and dances:

Yorkshire Buffs, Portsmouth, Air in E minor, Gavotte, Minuet with variations

 

English Songs:

Come away death (Arne), Wilt thou forgive that sin (Humfrey), Evening Hymn (Henry Purcell), Who knocks at my heart (Daniel Purcell)Man is for the woman made (H Purcell)

 

Two Minuets from Sonata in D minor by Willem De Fesch

 

Cruel Amynto (de Fesch), Where the bee sucks (Arne), The lass with the delicate air (Arne), When a tender maid (Linley), When daisies pied (Arne)

 

Traditional Scottish Songs arranged by J Haydn:

John Anderson, I love my love in secret, O had awa frae me, The gard’ner with his paidle, Love will find out the way, The white cockade

 

Sonata for viola da gamba (Abel): vivace, adagio, minuetto

 

Hindustani tunes:

From The Oriental Miscellany, being a collection of the most favourite airs of Hindoostan, compiled and adapted for the harpsichord by William Hamilton Bird in 1789. Two different pieces,both called Rekhta.

 

Three Burns songs:

A man’s a man for a’ that, My love is like a red red rose, Scots wa hae wi’ Wallace bled,

 

The Cock Laird (for ‘cello, by Oswald)

 

Three English Dances:

Corn riggs, The Quaker’s wife, Merrily kissed the Quaker (trad)

 

Sonata in A minor (Galliard): largo e staccato, Hornpipe a L’Inglese, Allegro e staccato

 

Italian Songs:

Amor dormiglione (Barbara Strozzi), Non e pena maggior (Bottegari), Perfidissimo volto, Star vicino (Rosa,) L’Eraclito amoroso (Strozzi)

 

English airs and dances

Two Cheshire rounds, New Perro, Back Jack, The cackling of the hens

 

Kathleen Berg (soprano, harpsichord, common flute)

Alan Morris (’cello, viola da gamba)

 

 

Music from the English Augustan Age – the time of Queen Anne and the first two Georges.

 

Musick Rediscover’d 23rd September 2015, at Allegro Apassionato, Conoco Room, Louth Library 

The “Augustan Age” was so called because, at the time, writers compared their literature with that of the time of the Emperor Augustus. Particularly, poets such as Dryden and Pope were consciously emulating literature of the first Augustan Age. However this high minded style had little influence on the music of the time, except that texts for songs and operas often used classical, pastoral motifs and of course classical names – Chloe, Myrtilla, Daphne and the like. The music we are performing today is typical of this period: nearly all was written by English composers and it displays a native tunefulness and typical harmonic quirkiness. 

 

Daniel Purcell (1664 – 1717) Sonata in F for recorder and continuo. Like his cousin Henry, Daniel was a prolific composer for the stage, writing the incidental music for some 40 plays. He also wrote for the church and chamber. This present sonata is typical of his style, full of interesting harmonies.

 

Pelham Humfrey (1647 – 1674) “An Hymne to God the Father”. Pepys writes  “Little Pelham Humphreys is an absolute monsieur as full of form and confidence and vanity, and disparages everybody's skill but his own.” His music is innovative in its use of dissonance and has an introspective intensity rarely matched before or since. Alas he died aged 27. Little of his music survives, mostly ecclesiastical. This hymn is a setting of words by John Donne, punning on his name – “Wilt thou forgive that sin where I began ... When thou hast Donne, thou hast not done, for I have more ... But swear by thyself that at my death, Thy SUN shall shine ... And having done that, Thou hast Donne, I fear no more.”.

 

Henry Purcell (1659 – 1695) “Sweeter than Roses”. Nobody wrote better songs in English, or indeed in any language, and this is amongst his very finest.

 

John Stanley (1712 – 1786) Cantata 1. Stanley is remembered now as the “blind organist” and his voluntaries for organ are still performed. He was also a prolific composer of chamber music. This present cantata comes for a set of six published in 1751. Its text is typical of the time – simply summarised: Is Myrtilla’s heart for sale? NO! NEVER!

 

Eliza Turner (1700 – 1756) Song “Blessed be those sweetly shining eyes”. A lady composer! Alas little is known of her: this song came from a set published in 1751. The long list of subscribers includes Handel and Stanley: she was clearly highly regarded. Of her other compositions only a set of harpsichord pieces survives.

 

Three short pieces for harpsichord: Prelude (H. Purcell) Hornpipe (D. Purcell) and Aire (William Croft 1678 – 1727). English keyboard music from the early 18th century is very neglected, and indeed it is small-scale, even slight, certainly when compared with the music of the French clavicenists  and of course the likes of JS Bach. But it is delightful.

 

John Loeillet (1680 – 1730) Sonata in C for recorder and continuo. “John of London”, to distinguish him from his cousin. “John of Ghent” came to London in his twenties, and like Handel he spent the rest of his life there. Also like Handel he made his living through performing, composing, putting on concerts and the theatre rather than ecclesiastical or royal appointments.

 

Two more songs by Henry Purcell. “What shall I do?”; “Fairest Isle”

 

Maurice Greene (1696 – 1755) “Orpheus with his lute”. From 1735 Greene was Master of the King’s Music. He is today best known for his compilation (with Boyce) of English Cathedral Music. This setting of “Orpheus with his lute” from Shakespeare’s Henry VIII is an example of the more serious songs of the time (cf those by Stanley & Turner) and is exquisite.

 

Henry Purcell “A new Ground” for harpsichord.

 

Anon “The Vicar of Bray”: a summary of the religious turbulence of the time. The present words were compiled (mostly) in the 18th century. The tune is said to be 17th century and is called “English Gardens”; it appears (or something very like it) in the “Quaker’s Opera” of 1728 and was rediscovered (it is said) by Cecil Sharp. Not to be confused with the Morris dance “In an English Country Garden”.

 

And this is law, I will maintain
Unto my Dying Day, Sir.
That whatsoever King may reign,
I will be the Vicar of Bray, Sir!

 

Musick Rediscover’d at 

 

Kathleen Berg, harpsichord and soprano

Richard Lindsay, counter-tenor, recorder and harpsichord

Alan Morris, violoncello

http://www.spanglefish.com/musickrediscoverd/
 

 

We were playing in the procession at Bosworth  with Richard III's coffin on March 22nd!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-32010172

and also for the Magna Carta dinner for the Lincoln Record Society in the Chapter House of Lincoln Cathedral. Both these events were with the Lincoln City Waites.


 

 

Gunby Hall December 2015

The Twelve days of Christmas

The twelve days from Christmas Day to January 5th – the day before Epiphany – are the core of the Christmas season, when we decorate our houses with greenery and celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ with feasting and the giving of presents to those we love. The poem “The twelve days of Christmas” marks a particularly lavish twelve days! The earliest printed version dates from the late eighteenth century, but it may well be much older and perhaps originally was French. There are many variants of the words, and many musical settings. For our Christmas music at Gunby this year we present eight versions of “The twelve days” within a programme of Christmas music dating from medieval times to the nineteenth century. As we are in a Georgian house we perform the music as though by a lady and gentleman of about 1780.

Please feel free to talk to us about the music and about the way we perform it.

The first day … a partridge in a pear tree

Christmas day: we hail the birth of Christ in songs that speak of the stable in Bethlehem and Angels praising God. But we also remember his mother, singing lullabies to her child, and that the story really begins with the Archangel Gabriel proclaiming to her that she was to be the mother of God!

The Angel Gabriel; While Shepherds watched; Tomorrow shall be my dancing day; Joy to the world; Sweet was the song the virgin sang; All my heart this night rejoices; My sweet little darling; Nativity.

The second day… two turtle doves; the third day … three French hens

 

 

 

 

 

http://catholicism.about.com/od/Christmas/tp/What-Are-The-Twelve-Days-Of-Christmas.htm

http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/Notes_On_Carols/twelve_days_of_christmas.htm

The Twelve days of Christmas

The twelve days from Christmas Day to January 5th – the day before Epiphany – are the core of the Christmas season, when we decorate our houses with greenery and celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ with feasting and the giving of presents to those we love. The poem “The twelve days of Christmas” marks a particularly lavish twelve days! The earliest printed version dates from the late eighteenth century, but it may well be much older and perhaps originally was French. There are many variants of the words, and many musical settings. For our Christmas music at Gunby this year we present eight versions of “The twelve days” within a programme of Christmas music dating from medieval times to the nineteenth century. As we are in a Georgian house we perform the music as though by a lady and gentleman of about 1780.

Please feel free to talk to us about the music and about the way we perform it.

The first day … a partridge in a pear tree

Christmas day: we hail the birth of Christ in songs that speak of the stable in Bethlehem and Angels praising God. But we also remember his mother, singing lullabies to her child, and that the story really begins with the Archangel Gabriel proclaiming to her that she was to be the mother of God!

The Angel Gabriel; While Shepherds watched; Tomorrow shall be my dancing day; Joy to the world; Sweet was the song the virgin sang; All my heart this night rejoices; My sweet little darling; Nativity.

The second day… two turtle doves; the third day … three French hens

 

 

 

 

 

http://catholicism.about.com/od/Christmas/tp/What-Are-The-Twelve-Days-Of-Christmas.htm

http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/Notes_On_Carols/twelve_days_of_christmas.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




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