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Jackie's Writings

 

AERA 2014 Paper with Jack Whitehead:

http://www.actionresearch.net/writings/aera14/jwjdaera2014paperok.pdf

 

The presentation fulfils three purposes. The first is to make self-study contributions to a valid history of S-STEP as additions to the history of S-STEP presented by Hamilton at the 2013 AGM of the AERA, S-STEP SIG, in relation to the theme of AERA 2014 on the power of education research for innovation in practice and policy. The second is to provide an evidence-based justification for the use of multi-media narratives with digital technology in S-STEP research to supplement printed text-based media for communicating valid explanations of educational influences in learning. The third is to present new living standards of judgment and explanatory principles in terms of the energy-flowing, relational, and inclusional values of self-study researchers whose inquiries are taking place in a range of international contexts.

AERA 2013 PAPERS:

 

Action research transcends constraints of poverty in elementary, high school and post-graduate settings

 

Elizabeth Campbell, Nipissing University

 

Jacqueline Delong, Brock University

Cathy Griffin, Bluewater District School Board

(with Jack Whitehead, Liverpool Hope University and the University of Cumbria)

 

 

A paper presented at the 2013 American Educational Research Association Conference with the Theme: Education and Poverty: Theory, Research, Policy and Praxis in San Francisco, USA, April, 2013

 

 

 

Abstract

 

 

The originality of this presentation is in the evidence-based explanation of transcending constraints of poverty through the evolution of meanings of a culture of inquiry with a multi-media narrative of the mutual educational influences in learning of four action researchers. The constraints of poverty being transcended are traditional academic forms of print-based texts and the neglect of moral and aesthetic values. These can limit the validity of communications of the embodied meanings of the energy-flowing values of professional educators in explanations of their educational influences in learning. The paper follows the works of the authors from its inception with the creation of an original methodology, Living Educational Theory (Whitehead, 1989), to its implementation and refinement in an original pedagogy by masters and doctoral students and to the improvement of learning in primary, secondary and tertiary classrooms across the globe.

 

 
 
 

How are we creating cultures of inquiry with self-studies that transcend constraints of poverty on empathetic learning?

 

For presentation at the 2013 American Educational Research Association Conference in San Francisco with the Theme: Education and Poverty: Theory, Research, Policy and Praxis

 

Jacqueline Delong, Brock University

Elizabeth Campbell, Nipissing University

Jack Whitehead, Liverpool Hope University

(with

Cathy Griffin, Bluewater District School Board)

 

Abstract

 

This presentation offers evidence in support of a theoretical analysis that explains how cultures of inquiry can be created that can contribute to transcending constraints of poverty. It addresses the issues of moral poverty of education discourses that fail to address the ethical bases of educational discourses and practices.  It offers self-study, evidence-based explanations of the educational influences of practitioner-researchers to show how environments of artistic impoverishment can be transformed through offering opportunities to develop creative talent  and aesthetic appreciation.  

 

It uses digital technology to ‘bridge divides of economic capital through digitally‚Äźmediated education that connects rural and urban students to rich educational  resources outside the classroom walls’. (Tierney & Renn, 2012, p.2)  A method of ‘empathetic resonance’ using digital technology is introduced to clarify the meanings of the expression of embodied values and energy.   These meanings we gain from video contribute to the explanatory principles of educational influences in learning how to reduce poverty and create attitudinal, behavioural, and social transformational learning opportunities. 

 

The presentation accepts and responds to the purpose of the theme of AERA 2013 to signal that ‘we must engage and examine the complexities of poverty, as well as challenge oversimplifications (eg)  in how we study and address poverty and its consequences.’ (Tierney & Renn, 2012, p.2). It also demonstrates how both halves of the AERA mission can be fulfilled through educational research:

“to advance knowledge about education, to encourage scholarly inquiry related to education, and to promote the use of research to improve education and serve the public good.”  (Ball and Tyson, 2011). The presentation attempts to address the question, How can living educational theory in a culture of inquiry address the negative effect of impoverished educational environments to improve educational practice, educational research and the social/public good?

 
AERA 2011 PAPER:

 

Transforming educational knowledge through making explicit the embodied knowledge of educators for the public good.

 

Jacqueline Delong, Brock University, Ontario, Canada

Jack Whitehead, Liverpool Hope University, UK.

 

A paper presented at the 2011 American Educational Research Association Conference in New Orleans, USA, 9th April 2011.

 

Abstract

 

This paper focuses on making explicit the embodied knowledge of educators using a living theory methodology and inciting the social imagination to create educational research for the public good. Using evidence from international contexts, the meanings of the energy-flowing values that educators use to explain their educational influences in their own learning and in the learning of others, are becoming more explicit. The evidence includes the living educational theories of professional educators, educational leaders and students as they study their practice in improving practice and creating cultures of inquiry.  The authors study their practice in their own contexts building on learning from each other and from critiques of AERA presentations in improving the interpretation of multimedia data to represent and generate knowledge. Visual narratives are used to bring practitioner knowledges into the Academy with living standards of judgment. 

jdjwaera2011jointsubmissionfinala.doc

 

AERA 2010 PAPER:

 

 

Engaging Educators in Representing Their Knowledge in Complex Ecologies and Cultures of Inquiry
 

Abstract


This paper is a self-study in which a university teacher educator studies her practice. She creates a space for alternate ways of representing forms of knowledge from diverse cultural backgrounds, including Indigenous, and for their accreditation in the Academy. As she develops a way of thinking that is appropriate for getting closer to understanding
indigenous ways of knowing, there is a transformation in her own understandings. Moving from reliance on print to the use of multi-media and artifacts to represent forms of knowledge in complex ecologies support the development of cultures of inquiry. In this work, the meanings of the embodied energy-flowing values that educational researchers use to explain their educational influences in their own learning and in the
learning of others, are made explicit. These meanings are shown to have epistemological significance for educational knowledge.

Here is the videoclip of my presentation at the Self-Study of Teacher Education Practices at AERA on May 4, 2010:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HINtDgtLsYI

Jacqueline Delong, Brock University, Canada.
Jack Whitehead, Liverpool Hope University, UK.

Transforming educational knowledge through making explicit the embodied knowledge of educators in complex ecologies and different cultural contexts.

This poster focuses on making explicit the embodied knowledge of educators within complex ecologies using a living theory methodology in different cultural contexts. Using evidence from aboriginal and non-aboriginal contexts the meanings of the energyflowing values that educators use to explain their educational influences in their own
learning and in the learning of others, are made explicit. The evidence includes the living educational theories of professional educators, educational leaders and students as they study their practice in improving practice and creating cultures of inquiry. Evidence is drawn from an aboriginal context for a First Nation masters group and from living
educational spaces in which creative and performance arts with visual narratives are used to bring non-indigenous and indigenous knowledges into the Academy with living standards of judgment.




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