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These drawings are from the 80s, when I had many published in British Small Press SF & Fantasy magazines.

It's always surprising which drawings people like. This was never one of my best, it's a little robot window cleaner, generating water and power from the solar cells on his back. Here he is plodding up and down the skyscrapers long after humans are no more...

But it made the cover of British small press magazine Foundation, in 1989:

...and someone nominated it for a Hugo award! Probably the highlight of my artistic career until being no-platformed in 2020 by the Morning Star!

'The Light', by Paul Anderson, another great story about an artist.Another of my Rotring pen efforts.This one's from 1984.
Distant Music
Distant Music
Published as a poem illustration, these are three creatures from the far future of humanity, descendants of man, rodents and fish. This was the cover for a book of fantasy poems by K.V.Bailey called 'Distant Music' (Alderney press 1987) which contained several of my drawings.
An illustration to one of the greatest sf novels, 'The Last Day of Creation' by Wolfgang Jeschke. "In his night-black eyes could be seen the reflection of the stars".
Unpublished.
'Voice of the Cielago' - illustration to another classic, Dune.
Unpublished.
'And all the flower of England perished there.' I can't remember where the quote came from, but it inspired this picture of the Roman subjugation of England.
Unpublished.
Crystal Ship
Horsemen.
Everyone likes this picture, maybe it's because it's ambiguous. Are these survivors or the perpetrators? Actually it's my idea of the Riders of Rohan coming back from burning the Orcs!
St Michael and All Angels
Un-named, probably inspired by Dune. Rotring pen again.
Dragons Egg
The Pellenor Field, from LOTR- " No few had fallen, renowned or nameless".I am one of those annoying people who can tell you exactly what's happening in the LOTR if you dropped the book on the floor and read the first few words on a randomly opened page.
"How many miles to Babylon"? by the wonderful Jennifer Johnstone, published 1974. Which means I was about 16 when I drew this.
A very LOTR landscape.
Second Dawn by Arthur C Clarke.
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