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Handbell Music - R

Published Handbell Music of Malcolm C Wilson

Title, Range, Level, Date of publication, Publisher, Code, Additional instruments.
Information about each title is included for use by a compère or use in printed concert notes.

All titles can be ordered direct from the publishers indicated or from your usual music supplier, or from Jeffers (www.handbellworld.com) in the USA, or Whitechapel Handbell Music Shop in the UK.

Reflection on "Kelvingrove", 2-3 octaves, level 1, 1998, Lorenz, 20/1130L
Based on the traditional Scottish melody this reflective piece may be performed as an aid to reflection during meditative reading of the text of the hymn by John L. Bell and Graham A. Maule "Will you come and follow me if I but call your name" (The Summons). Alternatively a narrator may read the text of the hymn in a free manner. 

Kelvingrove on the River Kelvin, near where it joins the River Clyde, is now a part of the city of Glasgow.  This tune appears in Smith’s collection “Scottish Minstrel” in 1824, though it was then called Kelvin Water, but the tune was long known as “O the shearin’s no for you” which was the first line of the old song.
This arrangement was ranked within top 40 of retail sales for 1998, Jeffers Retail Division.

Have you performed this music?  Do please write and let me know by clicking here.

Click play below to watch and listen to a performance of Reflection on Kelvingrove by Dunblane Cathedral Handbell Ringers

 

 

Reflections on a Lewis Folk Melody, 2-3 octaves, level 1, 2009, From The Top Music, in collection "Celtic Reflections - Three Scottish Folk Tunes", 20204.

The Isle of Lewis is at the north-west corner of the group of Scottish islands known as theHebrides, or Western Isles, which stretch for 100 miles. Lewis is the largest and most populatedof the Outer Hebridean islands and has notable archaeological sites including the NeolithicCallanish Stones, the Pictish Carloway Broch(roundhouse), and one of the smallest, but possibly one of the most famous archaeological finds- the Lewis Chess set - 78 Norse chessmen dating from the 12th century carved from Walrusivory depicting various figures such as church dignitaries and Viking warriors of the period.

This melody is used for hymns "Jesus Calls Us Here to Meet Him" by John Bell and Graham Maule, writers of the Iona Community; and "Come and find the quiet centre" by Shirley Erena Murray. 

Have you performed this music?  Do please write and let me know by clicking here.

Click play below to watch and listen to a performance of Reflections on a Lewis Folk Melody by Dunblane Cathedral Handbell Ringers

 

Reflection on "St Clement", 3-5 octaves, level 3, 1998, Jeffers, JH S9230
Based on the hymn-tune by Clement Cotterill Scholefield, this reflective piece may be performed as an aid to reflection during meditative reading of the text of John Ellerton's hymn "The day thou gavest, Lord, is ended" for which the melody was composed. Commissioned for member of St Wulfram's Handbell Ringers, Grantham, Lincolnshire.   Massed ringing selection 1999 HRGB National Residential Ringing Week, Dunblane.

 

Click play below to listen to a recording by The Bluebells of Tokyo, Japan, under the direction of Eiko Kimura:

 

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Have you performed this music?  Do please write and let me know by clicking here.

Click play below to watch and listen to a performance of Reflection on St Clement by Dunblane Cathedral Handbell Ringers

 

Renaissance Dance - Volta from Terpsichore, 2-5 octaves with optional percussion, 2-part descant recorders, or violin and cello, or keyboard, level 2, 2008, From The Top Music, 20174-M (conductor full score); 20174-H (handbell score); 20174-SK (strings/keyboard score); 20174-R (2-part recorders score).


A Renaissance Dance is based on Volta from Terpsichore by Michael Praetorius (1571-1621), a lively dance tune rooted in medieval dance song. This and many other such tunes sprang up as dance songs to help celebrate the movement from darkness to light at the winter solstice - an occasion of joy and hope. This tune is appropriate at any time of the year and is often used at Christmas since in the 19th century, this tune was given Christmas words: “Jesus so sweet, Jesus so mild, Jesus was born a little child. 

Have you performed this music?  Do please write and let me know by clicking here.

Click play below to watch and listen to a performance of this arrangement of Renaissance Dance - Volta from Terpsichore performed by Celtic Carillon, Scotland's national handbell ensemble in Dunblane Cathedral.

 

 

Ring of Praise, 2-5 octaves, level 3, 2003, Lorenz, 20/1271L, optional Bb clarinet, organ solo reed or violin.
An original composition.

 

Have you performed this music?  Do please write and let me know by clicking here.

 

Rondo Campana, 2-5 octaves, level 3, 1993, Lorenz, 20/1018, optional chimes
Prize winner in Handbell Ringers of Great Britain Silver Jubilee Composition Contest 1992.

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Click on the video below to listen to a performance of Rondo Campana by Shoin Handbell Ensemble directed by Nozomu Abe

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOhvtNV3wk0

 

The Rowan Tree, 2-3 octaves, level 1, 2009, From The Top Music, in collection "Celtic Reflections - Three Scottish Folk Tunes", 20204.
 

The Rowan Tree was penned by Carolina Oliphant, Lady Nairne (1766-1845), first published in the Scottish Minstrel, 1822.

The Rowan Tree is also known as the Mountain Ash. The Rowan Tree takes its name from Celtic and Scottish legends that tell of the Rowan tree symbolizing beauty, privacy, peace and sanctuary. According to tradition, the tree would normally be planted at the door of the house for protection from evil spirits and give the occupants privacy, peace, and refuge.

The melody of The Rowan Tree is used for the hymn "I heard the voice of Jesus say Come unto me and rest" by Horatius N Bonar (1808-1889).

 

Have you performed this music?  Do please write and let me know by clicking here.

Click play below to watch and listen to a performance of The Rowan Tree by Dunblane Cathedral Handbell Ringers.

 

 

 


 

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